Norfolk
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Exposure bias: -3/10EV
  • Focal length: 25mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/200s

We were spending a few days at a friend’s thatched cottage somewhere in the Norfolk countryside, eating well and drinking plenty as we caught up on each other’s news over the last 2-3 years. I woke up early on our final day, more bleary eyed than hungover this time around and before either of our families were stirring. I decided on the spur of the moment to go off for a wander with my camera gear to see if I could capture a few memories. It wasn’t until I stepped outside the front door that I became aware of the thick fog blanketing my surroundings and felt a little surge of excitement building up at what the elements might bring to the light. I only had to open their gate and step onto the lane for the first shot to jump out at me, an evergreen standing proud on its own manicured lawn.

  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Exposure bias: -3/10EV
  • Focal length: 25mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/200s

That was some seriously thick fog and it didn’t look like the sun would be breaking through any time soon. There’s ‘Field with Telegraph Pole, then ”Field with Chair’, quickly followed by ‘Field with Tractor Tracks and Distant Spinney’…

Without really noticing, I’d been walking up a slight incline and the fog began to thin. The yellowish light of the sun trying to break through, the hint of a blue sky, the frost covering every blade, all these elements were coming in and out of view as the light changed rapidly in the thinning mist. I swapped over from the Sony FE 55mm f/1.8 lens to the newest addition in my lens line-up, the Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2. I hadn’t had much opportunity to give this lens a proper workout and was looking forward to seeing what it could do. All I can say after seeing the results in hires is that it may all be about the light but it sure helps when you have stellar glass to feed all that detail through to the resolution hungry sensor on the Sony A7R2.

As my professional line of work usually involves having people in the frame, I don’t often shoot with wide angles. Looks like I’ll just have to do more personal projects, then! Eventually, hunger and the need for coffee drew me back to the cottage. No-one was up yet, apart from a strange part of the world looking out at me, and it wasn’t long before I was tucking into a big fry-up with our two families. Simple pleasures, in a beautiful part of England.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Focal length: 55mm
  • ISO: 500
  • Shutter speed: 1/100s

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